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THE FUTURE OF HIGHER (LIFELONG) EDUCATION:
For All Worldwide, A Holistic View

(All chapters are intended for continuing revision)

Volume I | Volume II | Volume III

VOLUME I

Index to Volume One in Chinese is at end of Volume One index below.

THE FUTURE OF HIGHER (LIFELONG)  EDUCATION AND VIRTUAL SPACE

Preface: CREATING THE EDUCATION FUTURE

1.P.1  Is There a Global Education Crisis?
1.P.2
  Global Lifelong Universities in the Coming Space Age
1.P.3
  What is Emerging for Lifelong Learning?
1.P.4
  Technology and Vision for Learning for All
1.P.5
  Changes in Higher/Lifelong Education Globally
1.P.6
  UNESCO: Mission and Functions of Higher Education
1.P.7
  UNESCO:: Vision for Global Higher Education
1.P.8
  Framework for Priority Action
Bibliographical Notes

1.1  Chapter One: FORCES INEVITABLY CHANGING EDUCATION

1.1.0  Imagining the Future Lifelong Learning System
1.1.1  Eight Social Hurricanes: (1) The Population Explosion
1.1.2  (2) Impact of Entertainment Culture
1.1.3  (3) The Knowledge Explosion
1.1.4  (4) Multiculturalism and Diversity
1.1.5  (5) Market Driven Globalization, Where Knowledge is Wealth
1.1.6  (6) University System  Deregulation
1.1.7  (7) Distance Education/Learning
1.1.8  (8) Accelerating Explosion of Technology
1.1.9  Creating a Global Learning Info-structure
1.1.10  A Dream of a World  System for Lifelong Learning
1.1.11  Why Such Distributed Programs?
1.1.12  Death (or Rebirth?) of the University as We Have Known It?
1.1.13  Beyond Traditional Distance Education.
Bibliographical Notes

1.2  Chapter Two: NEW STRUCTURES FOR LIFELONG GLOBAL LEARNING

1.2.1  Maps and Architectures
1.2.2  Global Administrative and Planning Structure
1.2.3  Governance in the NTU
1.2.4  The Commonwealth of Learning
1.2.5  A Premature Top Down Effort: The University of the World
1.2.6  The GLOSAS/Global University Project, Bottom-Up
1.2.7  Associations of Universities
1.2.8  Alternative Administration
1.2.9  Funding for Global Virtual Learning
1.2.10  A Global Strategy
Bibliographical Notes

1.3  Chapter Three: THE CHALLENGE OF FUTURE TECHNOLOGY

1.3.0  Transformational Technologies in Global Learning
1.3.1  Preserving Knowledge and Culture (Cosmopedia)
1.3.2  Mapping and Organizing Knowledge for Users and Transmission
1.3.3  Digital Wireless Broadband
1.3.4  Software for Human/Machine Collaboration
1.3.5  Improvising in the Developing World
1.3.6  Wireless Receivers and Senders
1.3.7  Global Strategy, Global Digital Divide
1.3.8  The Computer Engine
Bibliographical Notes.

1.4  Chapter Four: PLANNING FOR A QUIET REVOLUTION

1.4.0  A Planning Process for Global Virtual Lifelong Education
1.4.1  An Entirely New Model for lifelong Learning
1.4.2  Why Not Learning for All on the Internet?
1.4.3  Two-Way Exchange of Learning
1.4.4  Lifelong Learning for All Ages and Needs
1.4.5  No New Colonialism
1.4.6  Can All Nations Afford to Participate? All People?
1.4.7  No Longer Just for the Elite
1.4.8  Beware of Hype
Bibliographical Notes

1.5  Chapter Five: GLOBAL VIRTUAL LIBRARY

1.5.1  Development of the University Libraries
1.5.2  The Online Reference Librarian
1.5.3  The End of Books? Google digital libary
1.5.4  The Global Virtual Library
1.5.5  Virtual Library Service for the On-Campus Learner
1.5.6  Library Services For the Distant Learner
1.5.7  Services For Researchers
1.5.8  Services to and for Developing Countries
1.5.9  A Global Strategy?
1.5.10  Many Problems to be Solved
Bibliographical Notes

1.6  Chapter Six: FACE TO FACE LEARNING COMMUNITIES

1.6.0  Notes on Context for Planning and Administration
1.6.1
  First Model: A Consortium of Small Residential Colleges
1.6.2
  A " Brand Name" Global Virtual University Consisting of Residential Face-to-Face College Learning Communities
1.6.3
  Achieving Excellence Together
1.6.4  A Consortium Can Wholesale Course Modules
1.6.5  Collaboration on Technology
1.6.6  Vision and Practical Matters
Bibliographical Notes

1.7  Chapter Seven: A GLOBAL MULTI-CULTURAL VIRTUAL UNIVERSITY

1.7.0  Administration and Standards for an `Ecological Model.'
1.7.1  Notes on Context
1.7.2  An Ecological Model
1.7.3  Vast Global Lifelong Curricula
1.7.4  A Global Catalog Consisting of Links to Every Online Catalog
1.7.5  For Profit?
1.7.6  Many Unresolved Problems
Bibliographical Notes

1.8  Chapter Eight: A GLOBAL VIRTUAL RESEARCH UNIVERSITY

1.8.0  Research Motivation, Vision, Tasks
1.8.1
  A Problem/Research-Centered Virtual University
1.8.2  Global Learning and Research Communities
1.8.3  Minds, Research and Culture
1.8.4  A Global Culture That is Scientific
1.8.5  Toward World-Scale Research Plans: Holistic, Social, Political
Bibliographical Notes

1.9  Chapter Nine: A GLOBAL COMMUNITY-COLLEGE CONSORTIUM

1.9.0  Focus on Local job Possibilities and Needs
1.9.1  A Global Consortium of Community Colleges
1.9.2  Neighborhood Learning Centers
1.9.3  Contributions of a Global Consortium
1.9.4  A Philosophy for Excellence: Learning Communities
1.9.5  Excellence in the Neighborhood
Bibliographical Notes

1.10  Chapter Ten: ANOTHER IDEA: GLOBAL VIRTUAL ‘LAND GRANT’ TYPE VISION

1.10.1  A Driving Moral Vision: A Professional Leadership Consortium
1.10.2  UNESCO World Declaration on Higher Education
1.10.3  Building Further on UNESCO Standards
1.10.4  Special Attention to Profession
1.10.6 WHERE NEXT IN VOLUMES II AND III?
Bibliographical Notes

Index to Volume One in Chinese is at end of index below.

VOLUME II

THE FUTURE OF RESEARCH: ON GLOBAL CRISES, STILL PRIMITIVE?

Preface: USING GLOBAL-SCALE TOOLS FOR RESEARCH ON HUMAN CRISES

         2.P.0  The Vision of J. F. Rischard  
         2.P.1   Explore Crisis-Oriented Research  
         2.P.2   Global Research on Learning Strategies 
         2.P.3   Research on Learning in a World of Crises 
         Bibliographical Notes

2.1  Chapter One: RESHAPING RESEARCH STRATEGIES

2.1.1  Why Drastic Change in Research
2.1.2  Some Cloudy Crystal Ball Predictions
2.1.3  Multi-Site and Problem Focused
2.1.4  NASA-Scale Research on Social Crises
2.1.5  Coordinating Many Minds and Institutions
2.1.6  Vision and Motivation for Change
2.1.7  New Hope for Developing-World Research
2.1.8  Pure Science? Not Either/Or
2.1.9  Is Research on Global Scale Problems Still Primitive?
Bibliographical Notes

2.2  Chapter Two: MOBILIZING THE WORLD'S KNOWLEDGE

2.2.1  Save What Knowledge and How Much of It?
2.2.2  World Wide Web/Digital-Library/Encyclopedia
2.2.3  World Brain/World Mind?
2.2.4  Biological Brain Analogy
2.2.5  Organizing and Managing Knowledge
2.2.6  Brain/Mind as Part of a Body and Culture
2.2.7  The World Brain As Process
2.2.8  Is a Global Blueprint Too Small?
Bibliographical Notes

2.3  Chapter Three:  PLANETARY TECHNOLOGY COORDINATION SYSTEM?

2.3.1  Convergence and More Powerful Computers
2.3.2  High-speed Interactive Networking
2.3.3  Software for Mega-research
2.3.4  Bandwidth as Communications Power
2.3.5  Database Automation
2.3.6  Larger Modeling and Simulating
2.3.7  Small Tools as Components
2.3.8  Co-laboratory Technology
Bibliographical Notes

2.4  Chapter Four: NETWORKING AND MOBILIZING COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE

2.4.1  Bringing Many Minds Together
2.4.2  Managing Better Collective Thinking
2.4.3  Collective Thinking A Process of Generations
2.4.4  Experimenting With the Process
2.4.5  Defining and Describing Collective Intelligence
2.4.6  A Mega-Thinking System
Bibliographical Notes

2.5  Chapter Five: LARGE-SCALE COMPUTER SIMULATIONS, MODELING, MAPPING

2.5.1  High Performance Collaborative Modeling
2.5.2  Modeling Described
2.5.3  Human Factor in Modeling and Simulations
2.5.4  Modeling for Dealing With Complexity
2.5.5  Linking Whole World Models
2.5.6  Constructing Digital World Learning Communities
Bibliographical Notes

2.6  Chapter Six: RESEARCH FOR INTERNATIONAL CO-LABORATORIES

2.6.1  Co-Laboratory Defined
2.6.2  A Virtual Global Situation Room
2.6.3  Biological System Co-Lab
2.6.4  Outer Space Co-Lab 
2.6.5
  Total Earth Management Co-Lab?
2.6.6  A Human Social System Co-Lab?
Bibliographical Notes

2.7  Chapter Seven: PEACE GAMING ON THE SCALE OF PENTAGON WAR GAMES

2.7.1  Gaming to Discover Consequences and Alternaives
2.7.2  Previous Online Peace Games
2.7.3  A 1986 Game Experiment
2.7.4  Begin With a Scenario
2.7.5  Empowered Collective Intelligence
2.7.6  Shared and Open Data
2.7.7  Simulating and Modeling a Global Peace System
Bibliographical Notes

2.8  Chapter Eight: RESEARCH FOR PLANETARY FOOD MANAGEMENT

2.8.1  Seeking A Research Design for Cyberspace
2.8.2  Holistic Research
2.8.3  Larger Research/Action Plans Underway
2.8.4  Linked Data Bases
2.8.5  Complex Research Needs
2.8.6  An Electronic Networking Partnership System
2.8.7  Hunger a Political Problem
Bibliographical Notes

2.9  Chapter Nine: PLANETARY HEALTH CARE

2.9.1  Existing Health Care Systems
2.9.2  Global-scale Health Care databases
2.9.3  Networking for Research
2.9.4  Research for Tele-Medicine
2.9.5  Transdisciplinary Modeling
2.9.6  Research Co-laboratories
2.9.7  Developing World Health Care
Bibliographical Notes

2.10  Chapter Ten: A HEALTHY PLANETARY ENVIRONMENT

2.10.1  A Global Strategic Research Plan
2.10.2  Earth Watching Satellites
2.10.3  Comprehensive Ecology Data-Bases
2.10.4  Global Rcology Networking
2.10.5  Co-Laboratory Research System
2.10.6  Modeling Planetary Management
2.10.7  Modeling the Politics of Ecology
Bibliographical Notes

2.11  Chapter Eleven: CITIES, WOMEN AND MANAGING POPULATION

2.11.1  Controversy Over Population Research Funding
2.11.2  Is There An Overpopulation Problem?
2.11.3  Research to Deal with Inter Linked Problems
2.11.4  Global Management Plans Exist
2.11.5  A Global Urban Observatory
2.11.6  Planetary Population Management
2.11.7  A Billion Networking Women
Bibliographical Notes

2.12  Chapter Twelve: ADEQUATE INCOME FOR EVERYONE

2.12.1  Research What? Holistic Economics and Politics?
2.12.2  Data on Poverty in Context
2.12.3  Some Components of a Global Poverty-Reduction Strategy
2.12.4  Large-scale Poverty-Reduction Modeling
2.12.5  An International Poverty-Reduction Co-Lab?
Bibliographical Notes

2.13  Chapter Thirteen: PLANETARY HUMAN SOCIETY MANAGEMENT

2.13.1  Global-Scale Crime Crisis
2.13.2  Terrorism and Aggressive War as Crime
2.13.3  Global-Scale Corruption
2.13.4  Holistic Research Strategy for Better Human Society
2.13.5  Interpol and Police Networking
2.13.6  Research for New Structures in Cyberspace
2.13.7  Learning from the International Medical System
Bibliographical Notes

2.14  Chapter Fourteen: MORAL AND ETHICAL CRISIS RESEARCH STRATEGY?

2.14.1  Is There a Global Moral Crisis?
2.14.2  Morality Research in the Global Virtual University
2.14.3  Global-Scale Humanities Data Bases
2.14.4  Resistance to Collaboration
2.14.5  Humanities Global Co-Labs
2.14.6  Strategic Research?
Bibliographical Notes

2.15  Chapter Fifteen: PLANETARY GOVERNANCE

2.15.1  Global Government or Governance?
2.15.2  Research in Governance Experimentation
2.15.3  A Governance Research Co-Laboratory?
2.15.4  A Warning System - for More Than War
2.15.5  Simulations, Modeling of Governance
2.15.6  More Information and A Larger Global Vision
Bibliographical Notes

2.16  Chapter Sixteen: RESEARCH FOR VISION, CARING AND RESPONSIBILITY

2.16.1  Dialog for Compassion
2.16.2  Moving Beyond Limited Religion Research
2.16.3  The Largest Religion Research Project in History
2.16.4  A Global Electronic Research Consortium
2.16.5  A Global Electronic Religion Library
2.16.6  Computer Networking for Dialog
2.16.7  Global-Scale Religion Research
2.16.8 REPORT ON A SCIENCE-RELIGION DIALOG CONFERENCE
Bibliographical Notes

2.17  Chapter Seventeen: RESEARCH FOR PLANETARY LEARNING STRATEGIES FOR POVERTY REDUCTION

2.17.0  Essential Larger Scale Learning Research
2.17.1  Is Learning  for All Now Possible?
2.17.2  A Holistic Co-Lab?
2.17.3  Developing World Learning/Research Needs
2.17.4  Strategic Policy Research
2.17.5  Partnership Learning
2.17.6  Research on Saving Money
2.17.7  Cultural Factors: A New Colonialism?
Bibliographical Notes

2.18  Chapter Eighteen: A POVERTY AREA AS A  RESEARCH CO-LAB

2.18.1  Begin Where the Problems are Most Difficult
2.18.2  Tele-Centers: Doors to Cyberspace
2.18.3  Simulating A Pilot Project
2.18.4  Strategic Research and Planning
2.18.5  Entrepreneurial Education
2.18.6  A Concluding Postscript
Bibliographical Notes


VOLUME III

FUTURE LEARNING AND TEACHING
Establishing a Learning  System for all in the World

Preface: LEARNING IN A PROFOUNDLY DIFFERENT FUTURE

3.P.1  Larger Technology Imagination3.P.2  Vouchers and Electronic Aid
3.P.3  Quality as Well as Quantity
3.P.4  Enlarging Passion for Learning
3.P.5  Some Cautions
Bibliographical Notes

3.1  Chapter One: THE LEARNER IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY

3.1.1  Many Problems and Needs are Not New
3.1.2  A Paradigm Shift in Learning
3.1.3  Getting Ready for New and Better Technologies
Bibliographical Notes

3.2  Chapter Two: TECHNOLOGY FOR LEARNING AND TEACHING

3.2.0  A Kludge of Uncoordinated Learning Technologies
3.2.1  Some Helpful Need-Oriented Technologies
3.2.2
  Mind Tools
3.2.3  Learners Need to See Results
Bibliographical Notes.

3.3  Chapter Three: LEARNING TAILORED TO THE INDIVIDUAL

3.3.1  A Computer Profile of Each Learner
3.3.2  Each Learner's Profile as the Basis for Lifelong Learning
3.3.3
  Life Mapping
3.3.4
  Special Needs, Problems, Deficiencies, Handicaps
3.3.5
  Profile of the Distant Learner
Bibliographical Notes.

3.4  Chapter Four: RE-INVENTING CLASSROOM AND CAMPUS

3.4.1  Begin With the Campus Structure We Have
3.4.2  Campus Architecture Can Teach
3.4.3  Classrooms and Resident Learning Facilities
3.4.4  A Global Virtual Campus
3.4.5  A Global Virtual Classroom
3.4.6  Online Campus Social Life
3.4.7  Some Enabling Technologies.
Bibliographical Notes

3.5  Chapter Five: DEVELOPING THE WHOLE PERSON

3.5.1  The Brain, Rich and Complex
3.5.2  Knowing More About the Brain/Mind
3.5.3  Augmenting Intelligence
3.5.4  Augmenting Memory
3.5.5  Collective Intelligence
3.5.6  Developing Spirit: Creativity and Imagination
Bibliographical Notes

3.6  Chapter Six: RE-INVENTING LEARNING AND TEACHING

3.6.0  Fewer Professors?  
3.6.1  Teamwork in Teaching and Learning
3.6.2  What is Good Teaching?
3.6.3  Enabled by New Kinds of Classroom and Office Technologies
3.6.4  Faculty/Student Communities of Learning
3.6.5  New Kinds of Electronic Materials - Student Mastery
3.6.6  Some Problems in Future Learning
3.6.7  Research
Bibliographical Notes

3.7  Chapter Seven: THE FUTURE OF  ONLINE `TEXTBOOKS' AND MODULES

3.7.0  Notes on Context
3.7.1  Loss of Profit From Printed Texts?
3.7.2  'Textbook' Tailored to Learner and Subject
3.7.3  Preparing Better for Higher Lifelong Education
3.7.4  The Distance Learner's Electronic Materials
3.7.5  An Electronic Tutor for the Whole World
Bibliographical Notes

3.8  Chapter Eight: TOWARD A GLOBAL LIFELONG LEARNING SYSTEM FOR AN ANGRY PLANET

3.8.0    Experiment, With Vision, credits and degrees
3.8.1    Global Semantic Web
3.8.2    Global Curricula
3.8.3    Global Cosmopedia
3.8.4    Global Library 
3.8.5    Free Courses - Global Philosophy of Learning
3.8.6    Global Catalog
3.8.7    Language Translation
3.8.8    Automated Testing
3.8.9    Automated Tutoring and Counseling
3.8.10  Global Portal
3.8.11  Global Co-laboratories
3.8.12  Global Meeting Places
3.8.13  Global Standards For Researcjand Administration
3.8.14  Peer Review
3.8.15  New Tools, Many Not Yet Imagined
3.8.16  Each Individual Learner
Bibliographical Notes

3.9  Chapter Nine:  BORK'S LIFELONG LEARNING SYSTEM FOR THE WORLD

3.9.0    Introduction to Automated Tutoring
3.9.1    Paradigms
3.9.2    Tutorial Learning With Computers 
3.9.3    Tutorial Learning is Adaptable  
3.9.4    Developing Tutorial Learning Modules 
3.9.5    Experiments  in Tutorial Learning, the Developing World
3.9.6    Full Implementation of Something New  
3.9.7    Global Distribution  
3.9.8    Conclusions
Bibliographical Notes

3.10  Chapter Ten: NEXT STEPS: A GLOBAL PLANNING NETWORK

3.10.0  Rischard on Solutions
3.10.1  A Global Planning and Action Network
3.10.2  Reaching out to All Concerned in the World  
3.10.3  Many Barriers to Overcome 
3.10.4  Value of Diversity in Learning
3.10.5  Enlarged Passion for Learning 
Bibliographical Notes

Subject Index (with links to many web pages)

Bibliography (older items not in the notes at end of each chapter)

Acknowledgments (to be revised)

译者前言

作者简介

访问作者

开放分享的新模式:麻省理工学院“网络公开课程”创设的影响

前言 开创教育的未来

1.P.1 是否存在一个全球教育危机

1.P.2 全球终身学习大学

1.P.3 什么正在悄然出现?

1.P.4 科学技术与人类学习的展望

1.P.5 全球高等教育和终身教育所发生的变化

1.P.6 联合国教科文组织高等教育宣言:高等教育的使命和功能

1.P.7 联合国教科文组织高等教育宣言:全球高等教育展望

1.P.8 优先行动方案

参考文献

第一章 必然引发教育改革的力量

1.1.0 未来终身学习体系的构想

1.1.1 八个社会风暴

1)青年和老年人口的爆炸

2 娱乐文化的影响

3 知识爆炸

4 多元文化与多样性          

5 市场推动全球化进程

6 对大学系统自治的冲击

7 全球远程教育

8 科技的迅猛发展

1.1.2 创建全球学习体系的基础设施

1.1.3 创建全球全民终身学习体系的梦想

1.1.4 通过网络分享课程资源的趋势

1.1.5 我们所熟知的大学:即将消亡或是重生?

1.1.6 超越传统的远程教育

参考文献

第二章 全球终生学习的新体系 虚拟空间(教室)

1.2.1展望与构想

1.2.2 全球管理和策划体系

1.2.3 对国家科技大学的管理

1.2.4 学习共同体

1.2.5 自上而下的雏形:“世界大学”工程

1.2.6 全球大学系统分析和模拟系统

1.2.7 大学联合会

1.2.8 可选择性管理模式

1.2.9 虚拟全球教学的经费问题

1.2.10 全球学习战略

参考文献

第三章 面临未来技术的挑战

1.3.0 变化的技术

1.3.1保存知识和文化(宇宙全书)

1.3.2为使用和传播而计划和组织的知识

1.3.3 数字无线宽带

1.3.4 人机协作软件

1.3.5. 在发展中国家因陋就简

1.3.6. 无线接受器和发射器

1.3.7. 全球战略:解决全球数字化鸿沟

1.3.8. 计算机动力

参考文献

第四章 为一场悄然到来的革命绘制蓝图

1.4.0 全球虚拟终生学习的规划过程

1.4.1 一种全新的终生学习模式吗?

1.4.2为什么不在互联网上推动全民学习呢?

1.4.3 学习的双向交流

1.4.4为不同需求和年龄的人提供终身教育

1.4.5 拒绝新殖民主义

1.4.6 所有国家都负担得起吗? 所有人都负担得起吗?

1.4.7 不再只是精英教育

1.4.8 谨防不切实际

参考文献

第五章 全球虚拟图书馆:可供所有人使用的网络资源

1.5.1 大学图书馆的发展

1.5.2 通过网络提供参考的图书管理员

1.5.3书籍会消失吗?

1.5.4 全球虚拟图书馆

1.5.5 虚拟图书馆为在校学生提供服务

1.5.6 图书馆为远程学习者提供服务

1.5.7 图书馆为研究者提供服务

1.5.8 对发展中国家的特别服务

1.5.9 全球战略

1.5.10 亟待解决的诸多问题

参考文献

第六章 面对面学习社区

1.6.0 对规划和行政管理情境的关注

1.6.1 第一种模式:小型寄宿学院联盟

1.6.2 包括面对面学习社区的全球虚拟大学品牌特色

1.6.3 共同追求卓越

1.6.4联合大学课程单元的整体提供

1.6.5 技术合作

1.6.6 展望和实践问题

参考文献

第七章 全球化多元文化虚拟大学

1.7.0 “生态模式”的管理与标准

1.7.1 对背景环境的关注

1.7.2 一种生态模式?

1.7.3大规模的全球终生学习课程

1.7.4 链接到每一个在线目录的全球课程目录

1.7.5 以赢利为目的吗?

1.7.6 许多尚未解决的问题

参考文献

第八章 全球虚拟研究性大学

1.8.0 研究动机、研究前景和研究使命

1.8.1 以问题研究为核心的虚拟大学

1.8.2 全球化学习和研究社区

1.8.3 思想、研究和多元文化

1.8.4 一种科学的全球文化

1.8.5 趋于世界规模的研究计划: 包含社会领域和政治领域的整体研究

第九章 发展城市和乡村的社区和技术院校联合体,推动社区终身教育。

1.9.0 关注地方工作机会

1.9.1 全球社区学院联合起来

1.9.2 社区学习中心

1.9.3全球性学院联合体所做出的贡献

1.9.4 对卓越理念的追求: 建立学习社区

1.9.5. 居民社区所体现的卓越

参考文献

第十章 另一种理念: 全球虚拟 “增地大学”模式的前景

1.10.1 一种道德驱动的展望: 专业领导虚拟联合体

1.10.2联合国教科文组织世界高等教育宣言

1.10.3进一步健全联合国教科文组织高等教育标准

1.10.4特别关注发展中国家的专业发展

1.10.5一些职业例证

1.10.6编后记:第二部与第三部简介

参考文献

译者后记

 

The Future of Higher (Lifelong) Education: For All Worldwide: A Holistic View
http://ecolecon.missouri.edu/globalresearch/chapters/index.html
For more information contact Parker Rossman
July 12, 2006 -- Copyright © 2002-2005 Parker Rossman